The Artist and the Commission.

Action motoring artwork, France, image, motoring artwork, Oil painting, Original artwork, Signed by Artist

art engine

 

This (motoring) artwork has been requested by our local Sapeurs Pompiers – Fire Brigade to you and I. This engine had recently been delivered to the Fire Station at Ercé en Lamée (my home village)  where is is based.    The work itself is 70cm x 50cm in size.

The work has been painted in Artist’s Oils on primed, box canvas and satin glazed for protection.

This is not the usual sort of work that people ask of me, but, I didn’t hesitate to do it.   Artists often are requested for work that is a little out of the ordinary, but if it fits in with the overall context of your work, why not?

If you have any queries about my motoring etc., artwork, commissions, Free,  Open                                                   Days & Art Demonstrations  etc.,  please contact me at:-                                                                           E-MAIL:-   art2cherish@orange.fr

TIME TO TAKE A BREAK.

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As an Art Tutor and also as a working artist, I realize that one of the problems faced by most artists is their propensity to keep on working at a drawing or a painting, often for hours on end, without a break.    This can and often leads to disaster as the artist has failed to take a break and stand back from their work to assess how the artwork is coming along and, to see if they have failed to spot an error.

This latter point particularly applies to technical aspects of the work, when a line (or two…..) when viewed consistently at close proximity, appears to be o.k., but when seen from a distance of a couple of metres away, shows up immediately as something that needs to be rectified, before the artists proceeds any further.  Remember, the viewing public will see your work in a Gallery, or Exhibition, etc., from a standing viewpoint and they will be some distance away from the work too.  And, some of them can be very (vocally) unforgiving if they spot a mistake you have made.

My advice is to take a viewing break every 15 to 20 minutes.    Not only will this give you a fresh viewpoint of your work, but it will also help you from becoming overtired.    It actually takes practice and discipline to develop the habit of taking these breaks, but it is a really useful way of ensuring that mistakes do not get drawn or painted into a finished artwork.   It is far easier and far less stressful, to rectify an error in its’ early stages than to attempt to correct it on an  finished artwork.